7 reasons that education technology research is reported inaccurately

You can't always believe what you read.

You can't always believe what you read.

We all know, I think, that when it comes to the reporting of research in the media, especially newspapers, you simply cannot take what you read at face value. This applies to all areas of research: scientific, medical and education. And, especially, education technology.

Why is this the case?

I've done quite a bit of research over the years, and I believe there are several factors at work:

  • The economics of newspapers
  • The process of producing a news story
  • The shape of the news story
  • Sub-editors
  • Psychological factors
  • Several kinds of effect (of which the best known one is no doubt the Hawthorne Effect, but there are others)
  • The quality of the original research.

I have given a couple of talks on this subject, once at the ResearchEd Tech talk in 2015, and again at the Roehampton Festival of Computing in 2016. On each occasion I've had time only to cover the first four factors mentioned above, so I've published the script of my talk plus a summary of my findings in the last three points above.

Did the OECD really say that?

Did the OECD really say that?

I have also included a section advising teachers and leaders of Computing, Education Technology or ICT in schools of how to avert the worst consequences, for them and their school, of the inaccurate reporting of research.

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